Candidates and reviewers should consider the “inclusive view of scholarship” in the University’s Promotion criteria, which specify that promotion, tenure or continuing status are based on:

excellent performance and the promise of continued excellence in 1) teaching, 2) service, and 3) research, creative work, and scholarship.  The University values an inclusive view of scholarship in the recognition that knowledge is acquired and advanced through discovery, integration, application, and teaching.  Given this perspective, promotion and tenure reviews, as detailed in the criteria of individual departments and colleges, will recognize original research contributions in peer-reviewed publications as well as integrative and applied forms of scholarship that involve cross-cutting collaborations with business and community partners, including translational research, commercialization activities, and patents.


More Resources on the University's Inclusive View of Scholarship

UHAP Chapter 3.3.02.b states that promotion and tenure require excellent performance and the promise of continued excellence in 1) teaching, 2) service, and 3) research, creative work, and scholarship.  The University values an inclusive view of scholarship in the recognition that knowledge is acquired and advanced through discovery, integration, application, and teaching.  Given this perspective, promotion and tenure reviews, as detailed in the criteria of individual departments and colleges, will recognize original research contributions in peer-reviewed publications as well as integrative and applied forms of scholarship that involve cross-cutting collaborations with business and community partners, including translational research, commercialization activities, and patents.

Parallel revisions were also made to our criteria for promotion and continuing status:

UHAP Chapter 4A.3.02.1 states that continuing status requires excellent performance and the promise of continued excellence in the candidate’s assigned duties, which may include teaching, outreach, service, and research, creative work, and scholarship.  The University values an inclusive view of scholarship in the recognition that knowledge is acquired and advanced through discovery, integration, application, and teaching.  Given this perspective, continuing status and promotion reviews, as detailed in the criteria of individual units, departments, and colleges, will recognize a wide range of original research-based contributions in peer-reviewed publications as well as integrative and applied forms of scholarship that involve cross-cutting collaborations with business and community partners, including translational research, commercialization activities, and patents.


View The Guide to the Promotion Process

Examples from Other Institutions
Promoting an Inclusive Vision of Scholarship is the proposal from the Academic Personnel Policy Committee of the Faculty Senate to revise the University’s promotion and tenure criteria to advance the innovations set out in President Hart’s Inaugural Address.

Models for revising P&T to include the scholarship of engagement have been developed by these Campus Compact resources:

  1. Rationales for Giving Engaged Scholarship Standing in Research University P&T Processes
  2. Policies for Encouraging and Assessing Engaged Scholarship in P&T Processes
  3. Evaluation Criteria for Assessing Engaged Scholarship in P&T Processes
  4. Demonstrating Quality and Impacts of Engaged Scholarship
  5. Tenure and Promotion Portfolio Exemplars

Models for campus conversations on revising P&T to include the scholarship of engagement are set out in this presentation on “Convening Constructive Conversations about Engaged Scholarship in Promotion and Tenure”

Faculty members improve their engaged scholarship through conversation, collaboration, and reflection with other engaged scholars. By working together, faculty members learn from one another the techniques needed to collaborate effectively and respectfully with their public(s), the strategies for publishing engaged scholarship in peer-reviewed journals, and other community and academic skills needed to be successful engaged scholars.

A model for a Community-Engaged Scholarship Review, Promotion & Tenure Package has been developed by the Community-Engaged Scholarship for Health Collaborative.

Evaluation Criteria for the Scholarship of Engagement are available on Scholarship of Engagement Online.

Thomas Miller, “The Academy as a Public Works Project, ” Academe (2012). (PDF) AAUP Online


Selected Research Universities that Have Revised P&T to Integrate the Scholarship of Engagement

Texas A&M Tenure Criteria Boosts Flow of Inventions
Tenure-track professors and researchers at the University of Texas A&M are finding they can get more than royalty payments by commercializing their innovations: it can ultimately help lead to the tenured position they covet.

University of Illinois at Chicago. (2000). Report of the Task Force on the Scholarship of Engagement

Michigan State University study of impact of the revisions of P&T in 2001 MSU’s revisions of P&T

North Carolina State University (2006). Reappointment, Promotion, and Tenure

Imagining America’s Scholarship in Public: Knowledge Creation and Tenure Policy in the Engaged University
The Imagining America Tenure Team Initiative was inspired by faculty members who want to do public scholarship and live to tell the tale. Publicly engaged academic work is taking hold in American colleges and universities, part of a larger trend toward civic professionalism in many spheres. But tenure and promotion policies lag behind public scholarly and creative work and discourage faculty from doing it.


Types and Definitions of Publicly Engaged Scholarship

Publicly Engaged Research and Creative Activities

Type 1. Researchbusiness, industry, commodity group funded. Sponsored research or inquiry supported through grants or contracts from businesses, industries, trade associations, or commodity groups (e.g., agricultural or natural resources groups) that generates new knowledge to address practical problems experienced by public or practitioner audiences.

Type 2. Researchnonprofit, foundation, government funded. Sponsored research or inquiry supported through grants or contracts from community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, foundations, or government agencies that generates new knowledge to address practical problems experienced by public or practitioner audiences.

Type 3. Research—unfunded or intramurally funded applied research. Community-responsive or community-based research or inquiry that is not funded by a community partner but instead is pursued by faculty through intramural support or as financially unsupported research or inquiry.

Type 4. Creative activities. Original creations of literary, fine, performing, or applied arts and other expressions or activities of creative disciplines or fields that are made available to or generated in collaboration with a public (non-university) audience.

Publicly Engaged Instruction

Type 5. Instruction—for credit—nontraditional audiences. Classes and instructional programs that offer student academic credit hours and are designed and marketed specifically to serve those who are neither traditional campus degree seekers nor campus staff.

Type 6. Instruction—for credit—curricular, community-engaged learning. Classes and curricular programs where students learn with, through and from community partners, in a community context, under the guidance and supervision of faculty members.

Type 7. Instruction—noncredit—classes and programs. Classes and instructional programs marketed specifically to those who are neither degree seekers nor campus staff.

Type 8. Instruction—noncredit—managed learning environments. Scholarly resources designed for general public audiences that are often learner-initiated and learner-paced (e.g., museums, galleries, libraries, gardens, exhibits, expositions).

Type 9. Instruction—noncredit—public understanding, events, and media. Scholarly resources designed for the general public that are accessible through print, radio, television, or web media. General examples include self-paced educational materials and products (e.g., bulletins, pamphlets, encyclopedia entries, educational broadcasting, CD-ROMs, software, textbooks for lay audiences); dissemination of scholarship through media (e.g., speakers’ bureaus, TV appearances, newspaper interviews, radio broadcasts, web pages, and podcasts, if scholarly and readily available to the public); and popular writing in newsletters, popular press, or practitioner-oriented publications.

Publicly Engaged Service

Type 10. Service—technical assistance, expert testimony, and legal advice. Provision of university-based knowledge or other scholarly advice through direct interaction with non-university clients who have requested assistance to address an issue or solve a problem.

Type 11. Service—co-curricular service-learning. Service-learning experiences that are not offered in conjunction with a credit-bearing course or academic program and do not include reflection on community practice or connections between content and the experience.

Type 12. Service—patient, clinical, and diagnostic services. Services offered to human and animal clients, with care provided by university faculty members or professional or graduate students, through hospitals, laboratories, and clinics.

Type 13. Service—advisory boards and other discipline-related service. Contributions of scholarly expertise made by faculty, staff, and students at the request of non-university audiences on an ad hoc or ongoing basis.

Publicly Engaged Commercialized Activities

Type 14. Commercialized activities. Translation of new knowledge generated by the university to the public through the commercialization of discoveries (e.g., technology transfer, licenses, copyrights, and some forms of economic development).

Doberneck, D. M., & Schweitzer, J. H. (2012). Disciplinary Variations in Faculty Expressions of Engaged Scholarship during Promotion and Tenure. IARSCLE Conference.